June 13, 2018

Dasgupta awarded new NASA NExSS CLEVER Planets grant

A brand new research project, funded by NASA’s Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS), was announced today. The multi-million-dollar project, dubbed CLEVER Planets (the Cycles of Life-Essential Volatile Elements on Rocky Planets), is headed by Rajdeep Dasgupta, at Rice University, and involves 10 other co-investigators at various institutions around the US and collaborators around the world. ExPeRT lab manager, Kyusei Tsuno and doctoral student, Damanveer Grewal will be assisting in the research for this massive investigation, which aims to better understand the chemical recipes that make life possible on rocky planets in our solar system and beyond.

Read the Rice University press release here.

And learn more about the project on the CLEVER Planets website here.


June 13, 2018

Saha Selected for AGU Voices for Science Program

The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has selected Sripana Saha for the inaugrual 2018 Voices for Science program in recognition of her outstanding work. The science communication program provides participants with resources, support, expense-paid travel to a workshop and skill-building in return for her "interest in sharing the value and impact of Earth and space science with key decision makers, journalists and public audience, with the goal of increasing the widespread understanding of and support for science."


May 25, 2018

Grewal awarded Goldschmidt Travel Grant

Damanveer S. Grewal awarded a travel grant by the Geochemical Society to attend the August 2018 Goldschmidt Conference in Boston. He was selected for this NASA-funded grant out of all applicants who were required to follow the following guidelines: being a current graduate student or postdoctoral scholar in the US; and submitting an abstract "related to planetary sciences, i.e. work on the origin and history of solar system bodies (work on meteorites, Lunar rocks, sample returned from NASA missions, planetary analogues, experiments or modeling), or related to a NASA mission, or studying the potential for life elsewhere or of planetary resources for human space exploration."


April 25, 2017

Duncan & Dasgupta Identify A Source Of Earth's High Atmospheric Oxygen

Image modified from a figure in the paper, showing a schematic of the carbon cycling that would release oxygen to the atmosphere.

Image modified from a figure in the paper, showing a schematic of the carbon cycling that would release oxygen to the atmosphere.

After their publication in Nature Geoscience, now-graduate Megan Duncan and Rajdeep Dasgupta are quoted in various news articles reporting on their finding, including Live Science and Science Daily.

Their results, exploring the fate of organic compounds in subduction zones, indicate that early cycling and volcanism of carbon along plate boundaries may have led to the rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere. This sudden surge, called the Great Oxidation Event, which occurred about 2.5 billion years ago, may therefore be linked to plate tectonics. Duncan & Dasgupta's findings have implications for our planet's unique habitability.


Sept 5, 2016

Li, Dasgupta & Tsuno Explain Collisional Origin Of Earth's Carbon

Image by A. Passwaters/Rice University based on original courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech at http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1454.

Image by A. Passwaters/Rice University based on original courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech at http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1454.

With the publication of their Nature Geoscience article about Earth's carbon content, Yuan Li, Kyusei Tsuno and Rajdeep Dasgupta, swept international news. The findings from the three ExPeRT members and co-authors Brian Monteleone (WHOI) and Nobumichi Shimizu (Guangzhu Institute of Geochemistry in China), respectively, were reported by RiceBBCAstrobiology MagazineCBCBusiness InsiderSpace.com, and Yahoo! News, among others and were shared across social media.

The paper addresses the question of how early Earth became a host for carbon, a major building block of life. Carbon is a highly volatile element, easily vaporized and, thus, hard to retain. Li et al.'s results support the Late Veneer Hypothesis suggesting that a layered planetary embryo with a unique, Mercury-like make-up may have smashed into Earth, delivering the sulfur and carbon proportions we see in Earth's mantle today.


Jan 6, 2015

Dasgupta wins AGU Medal

Rajdeep Dasgupta was awarded the prestigious James B. Macelwane Medal at the Honors Reception at the 2014 AGU Annual Meeting in San Francisco, CA, as one of five with “significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding early career scientist.” 


In a Nature Jobs blog post titled "Hopes for the year ahead," Rajdeep Dasgupta, among other highly recognized young scientists, was interviewed about his plans and wishes for the future of science, including getting more hands-on in his lab, while finding "enough time to play with my three little boys and spend quality time with family and friends." He's quoted saying, "supporting more exploration and curiosity-driven science would be welcome."

Dec 30, 2014

Dasgupta addresses career plans


Jan 9, 2013

Mallik, Tsuno And Dasgupta Determine Depth Of Magma Formation In Earth's Interior

Schematic modified from the paper indicating the potential depths of melting underneath mid-ocean ridges where new seafloor erupts.

Schematic modified from the paper indicating the potential depths of melting underneath mid-ocean ridges where new seafloor erupts.

Several news reports, including the National Science Foundation (who funded the research) and Live Science, commented on the conclusions from a Nature publication by Rajdeep Dasgupta, Ananya Mallik, Kyusei Tsuno, and co-authors Anthony Withers (UMN), Greg Hirth (Brown) and Marc Hirschmann (UMN), regarding the depth of mantle melting that produces the magma erupting to form new crust at the surface.

Their experiments discerned that the onset of melting can shift deeper in the mantle when the rocks there contain heterogeneities like carbon. Their results modify previous thought, potentially explaining changes in seismic data at various depths in the mantle.


December 7, 2012

Dasgupta wins AGU Award

Rajdeep Dasgupta was recognized for the “accomplishments of junior scientists who make outstanding contributions to the fields of volcanology, geochemistry, and petrology” with the Hisashi Kuno Award at the 2012 AGU Annual Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA.


August 19, 2011

Dasgupta wins GS Medal

 

Rajdeep Dasgupta was a 2011 F.W. Clarke Medalist, presented by the Geochemical Society at the 2011 Goldschmidt Conference in Prague, Czech Republic, which "recognizes an early-career scientist for a single outstanding contribution to geochemistry or cosmochemistry, published either as a single paper or a series of papers on a single topic".


September 25, 2010

Dasgupta Receives Packard Fellowship

Rajdeep Dasgupta receives a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. Dasgupta is one of 17 early career professors named to the prestigious honor this year by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation


July, 2010

Publication featured in Reuter

Rajdeep Dasgupta’s publication selected for Reuter’s fast moving front commentary in the field of geoscience for the month of July, 2010. Dasgupta was interviewed by ScienceWatch.com to discuss his paper.